Research Participation - Seattle/Puget Sound

Researchers at the University of Washington in Seattle are seeking individuals treated for head and neck cancer to participate in a research study about the impact of cancer-related cognitive impairment on communication in everyday activities.

If you experienced any of the following over the course of your treatment for head and neck cancer, we need your help:
  • Being unusually disorganized
  • Confusion
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Difficulty finding the right word
  • Difficulty learning new skills
  • Difficulty multitasking
  • Fatigue
  • Feeling of mental fogginess
  • Short attention span
  • Short-term memory problems
We want to hear about your experience with cancer-related cognitive impairment and its impact on communication and participation in everyday activities, including those at home, work or school, and in the community. The information you provide will help in counseling patients undergoing treatment for head and neck cancer and in the development of future interventions.

Here are the criteria for participating:
  • 21 years of age or older
  • Ability to speak, read, and write English
  • You have had a medical diagnosis and treatment for head and neck cancer (e.g., tongue, throat (pharynx), voicebox (larynx), palate or anywhere in the mouth/oral cavity etc.)
  • Experience of cancer-related cognitive impairment (see list above)
  • Are at least 1 year post-treatment for your cancer
  • Currently live at home
  • Live in or near the Seattle/Puget Sound area, or be visiting the area, in order to participate in a face to face interview
Each participant will receive $30.00 for completing a face to face interview and a few short questionnaires to compensate for their time. Participation is voluntary, and in no way affects any medical care you might be receiving.

If you are interested in participating or need additional information, please contact me by phone at 206-616-0312 or via email at bolts@uw.edu. Note if you choose email, please be advised we cannot guarantee the confidentiality of information sent to you in this manner.

Thank you so much for your help!
Susan Bolt, MSP, CCC-SLP
Doctoral Student, Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences
University of Washington
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