My daughter is 25 years old with Breast Cancer

Anyone out there with a 25 yr old daughter with breast Cancer. My daughter has had all her chemo and just had a double mastectomy. She has triple negative invasive ductal carcinoma. Her surgeons are at University Hospital Cleveland Ohio. They are amazing she is being treated Mind, Body and Soul. These doctors are recognizing that she is only 25 and that she will need psychological help as well as medical help. This will be a long term commitment. The doctors have said that being that she is young and this is normally an older women's disease they will address life after cancer, body image and mind issues. This is an amazing program they started for the in betweeners she's not a child and not quite old enough to qualify AARP...lol If you have a young person with Cancer please blog. This is a new program at UH and they hope it takes off nationwide...

Comments

  • 11 Comments sorted by Votes Date Added
  • That sounds like a great program. It is weird being "in the middle" and I'm glad more cancer treatment centers are addressing our needs. I wish all the best for your daughter to have a speedy recovery in every sense of the word.
  • Your daughter sounds alot like me and my sister...we were both diagnosed at age 32, had doubles, did chemo and radiaton treatments...we are also both triple negative...turns out we both have the BRCA1 gene. We had NO history of breast or ovarian cancer in our families, just the 2 of us. It may be a good thing to request to be checked for the gene. Unfortunately, if she is a carrier, there is a good chance that there are other carriers in the family somewhere. This gene can be passed from the father's side as well, so even though mom or aunts are not affected it does not mean it is not in the bloodline. Depending on the gene, as well, it could add to the risk of ovarian cancer. My sister and I both have the gene that can cause both, she has had a full hysterectomy, and I will be having mine next year. I hope that this post offers some advice, and and does not add to the fears you guys are already going through. The great thing about our type of cancer is that it is EXTREMELY curable, and once the mastectomies are done and the breast tissue is removed, the chance of recurrence is minimal. Good luck with everything, and feel free to message me if you want to talk more. We are all here for you and your daughter! Be strong!!
  • saj2499saj2499 Community Member
    i too, was diagnosed with triple negative BC one day after my 35th birthday. i had a double mastectomy, and just finished chemo two weeks ago. i'm have my implant surgery this thursday and then will start radiation in a few weeks. the good news is, i had a PET scan last week and it was completely CLEAR!! all that chemo did the trick- bye bye cancer!!! :)
  • Hi Skline6381, I'm also a mom of a young adult cancer survivor and don't know many other folks in the same boat, so I recently started a blog called Always a Mom which you can find it at http://aaprich.blogspot.com/ (Wierd URL but it started as Always a Parent and I changed it.) I'm hoping to be able to engage other parents and find a place to just talk about the whole experience of having an adult child in this tough place. Please check it out and I's love to hear from you.
    Sounds like your daughter is in a fabulous program but I know you must have a ton of other stuff going on. My daughter was diagnosed at age 24 with metastatic thyroid cancer and she as been treated at Sloan Kettering in NY. She has now moved to Seattle but flies home twice a year for testing etc. Her last surgery was a year ago but she is doing great. She has also help found a program called True North Treks (truenorthtreks.org) that takes young adult cancer survivors into the wilderness in the Pacific NW where they camp, hike and do mind body work like meditation etc. They are running their next trip in the fall and are looking for participants so you might want to pass the info along to your daughter.
    Sending you a big mom hug and hope to hear from you.
  • Pink Fighter;2387 said:
    Your daughter sounds alot like me and my sister...we were both diagnosed at age 32, had doubles, did chemo and radiaton treatments...we are also both triple negative...turns out we both have the BRCA1 gene. We had NO history of breast or ovarian cancer in our families, just the 2 of us. It may be a good thing to request to be checked for the gene. Unfortunately, if she is a carrier, there is a good chance that there are other carriers in the family somewhere. This gene can be passed from the father's side as well, so even though mom or aunts are not affected it does not mean it is not in the bloodline. Depending on the gene, as well, it could add to the risk of ovarian cancer. My sister and I both have the gene that can cause both, she has had a full hysterectomy, and I will be having mine next year. I hope that this post offers some advice, and and does not add to the fears you guys are already going through. The great thing about our type of cancer is that it is EXTREMELY curable, and once the mastectomies are done and the breast tissue is removed, the chance of recurrence is minimal. Good luck with everything, and feel free to message me if you want to talk more. We are all here for you and your daughter! Be strong!!

    She has had the gene test she does not have it! She was tested for BRCA1 and 2 and also TP 53 and all were negative. So she is TNBC with no genetic mutation which is worse than BRCA because you don't know where reoccurance will be. Good Luck to you both also. xoxoxo MOM
  • Hi there, my daughter was just diagnosed on March 9 with Breast Cancer. March 30th, after many tests, Johns Hopkins determined she was stage 4 and started her chemo on the 31st. She has gone back to college and will have her next 2 treatments up at school so that she can finish the last 6 weeks of the semester and not lose those classes and have to take them again. She is a swimmer and has a very supportive and strong swim family. Nonetheless, her father and I are nervous wrecks. We really wish she was having her treatment here, where we can watch over her and help her when she needs it. I guess I'm wondering, the first treatment had hardly any affect on her...we're hoping the next is pretty mild, but wonder when the side affects really start to kick in?

    We are very proud of her strong positive attitude. When she was told it had metastasized and was not curable, she exclaimed, 'well that's just shitastic', and then said she wanted to move her treatment to Johns Hopkins, where they had treated more twenty-somethings and had a more positive outlook/attitude. We moved to Hopkins the next day. she has been extremely positive since day one and a force to be reckoned with when it came to discussions about treatment and school. She has said that this damn cancer is not a road block, but a speed bump, and that she wants to treat it as aggressively as possible.

    So here we sit, waiting, hoping, 700 miles away from her. Very proud of her strength and determination, but scared to death of her stubbornness and often times, laziness...she is a college student after all...and with a very high pain threshold. I would love to hear any tips and suggestions from other parents or college-aged patients.

    Thanks for reading :-)
  • My daughter was diagnosed last October at the age of 25 with a large invasive ductal carcinoma, and a larger area of ductal carcinoma in situ. She is ER+ PR+ (was negative at the time of her original diagnosis, but that changed with neoadjuvant chemotherapy) and HER2+++. She was in a clinical trial for 9 weeks but had to discontinue it due to severe side effects. She had a modified radical mastectomy on February 17 and is now undergoing A/C chemo.

    My heart goes out to you women, as when we were first on this horrible roller coaster ride, all I wanted was another mother of a young girl with breast cancer to reach out to. We are in an unusual and uncommon situation. Our children are newly out on their own, or just reaching that stage, and their own independence and need to feel control over their lives is supreme. It's hard enough to reassess our roles as parents without cancer jumping in to totally complicate the process. My daughter is amazingly strong, and courageous--more than I ever would have dreamed--and I have had to learn a great deal from her in the past six months, much of it painful, compounded by my daily terror about her welfare.

    I am a few months ahead of you in this process. Let me help you in whatever way I can.
  • I am sorry that I haven't replied in a timely manner
    Kirismum;3040 said:
    My daughter was diagnosed last October at the age of 25 with a large invasive ductal carcinoma, and a larger area of ductal carcinoma in situ. She is ER+ PR+ (was negative at the time of her original diagnosis, but that changed with neoadjuvant chemotherapy) and HER2+++. She was in a clinical trial for 9 weeks but had to discontinue it due to severe side effects. She had a modified radical mastectomy on February 17 and is now undergoing A/C chemo.

    My heart goes out to you women, as when we were first on this horrible roller coaster ride, all I wanted was another mother of a young girl with breast cancer to reach out to. We are in an unusual and uncommon situation. Our children are newly out on their own, or just reaching that stage, and their own independence and need to feel control over their lives is supreme. It's hard enough to reassess our roles as parents without cancer jumping in to totally complicate the process. My daughter is amazingly strong, and courageous--more than I ever would have dreamed--and I have had to learn a great deal from her in the past six months, much of it painful, compounded by my daily terror about her welfare.

    I am a few months ahead of you in this process. Let me help you in whatever way I can.
    Where do you live? We are in Ohio. Does your daughter live with you now? It will be a year in October and she had a bilateral mastectomy in March and is in a trial now and will be in this for the next 6 mths. I am glad to find another mother.xoxox Sandy
  • That camp sounds awesome. I don't know if she can physically do that yet as she is still in chemo. She is in a trial for the next 6 mths and it is physically taxing. We are in Ohio where are you? I appreciate your response.xoxox MOM
  • worrieddadworrieddad Community Member
    My daughter was diagnosed in October of 2015 at the age of 26. She had 12 rounds of chemo, both breasts removed, 3 lymphnodes removed, 30 rounds of radiation and reconstructive breast surgery (jelly bean implants). This is my worst nightmare and I still feel as though that it is a very bad dream. I worry constantly about my other two daughters, and that the cancer will reoccur elsewhere in her body. It's a life altering experience and really puts things into perspective. Cancer does not discriminate in regards to age, race, color, religion, gender, etc. My heart is truly shattered and I see more and more women everyday in the same boat , so to speak. It's just heart breaking and so sad.